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Martial Arts Styles Do Exist

In Uncategorized on August 3, 2015 at 10:22 am

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By Antonio Graceffo

Recently, I saw a Facebook video of a grappling competition, between a freestyle wrestler and a Brazilian Jujitsu practitioner. There are a lot of Youtube videos with titles like “Muay Thai vs. Kyokushin” or “Kung Fu vs. MMA” but what I liked about this particular video was that both practitioners were wearing the clothing appropriate to their art, which made them easily identifiable. The wrestler wore his singlet and wrestling shoes. The BJJ fighter wore a grappling shirt and shorts. The next thing that was special about this match up was that both men fought according to their distinctive styles. In this modern era of open grappling tournaments and MMA fights, most champion fighters are so well-rounded that the imprint of their original martial art is often barely visible.

The litmus test, for a fighter looking like his or her style, would be Ronda Rousey, who, in spite of being incredibly well-rounded, and in spite of having won her UFC 190 fight completely with striking, usually looks like a judoka. Watching her fights, it is generally clearly obvious that she comes from a world-class judo background. Lyoto Machida definitely owes much of his success to the fact that he fights like a karate man and both grapplers and strikers find it difficult to break inside of his unusual footwork. Another example would be Cung Le, whose san da background is evident in his MMA fights. But, when GSP defeated world-class wrestler Matt Hughes, did he really look like a kyokushin fighter? Or is there anything about Roy “Big Country” Nelson to suggest that his first martial art was kung fu?
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In this video matchup between the wrestler and the BJJ practitioner, the BJJ guy kept trying to pull guard, to take the fight to the ground, where he would have the advantage. The wrestler was clearly looking for, and got, the takedown, which is his strength. Once he engaged, the wrestler executed a suplex, followed by a high-crotch takedown. He slammed the BJJ guy so hard that the referee stopped the match.
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It was the comments posted on this video which caused me to write this article. “its not the name of the style… Its the practitioner”, “Jujutsu is wrestling, Judo – is wrestling”, “There are not ‘greco technique ‘ of ‘BJJ technique , ‘judo technique’ or ‘free style technique’ There are only ‘RIGHT TECHNIQUE’ and ‘WRONG’”.

Recently, I have heard a lot of people claiming that there are no martial arts styles, only “good technique” and “bad technique.” But this is simply not the case. Some techniques are similar across multiple styles, for example, a shoulder throw can be used in judo, shuai jiao, submission wrestling, or even san da. But other techniques are not. And if a particular style lacks a particular technique, the practitioners normally don’t drill the defense to that technique. Boxers, for example don’t practice sprawl, because there is no single or double leg takedown in boxing. Wrestlers don’t practice passing the guard, because that situation doesn’t exist in wrestling.
Styles definitely exist. And for that reason, when people wish to excel in mixed style events, like open grappling tournaments, or MMA fights, the best fighters tend to be complete fighters who train in multiple styles.

As anecdotal evidence proving the existence of styles, let me present the findings of my summer research. This summer, I travelled for three solid months training and filming Martial Arts Odyssey. My journey took me to Shanghai, Phnom Penh, Bangkok, New York, Singapore, and Johor Bahru. Along the way, I trained and/or filmed the following martial arts: san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, Kepap, catch wrestling, sambo, submission wrestling, judo, boxing, and Brazilian jujitsu.

In san da training, we spent an hour catching kicks. Kick catching is not taught in Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, catch wrestling, submission wrestling, judo, boxing, or Brazilian jujitsu.

In Greco-Roman wrestling we were practicing dropping to one knee and executing a fireman’s carry (without touching the opponent’s leg). This method is not taught in san da, shuai jiao wrestling or boxing.

In freestyle wrestling we were working on cat’s cradle pin. This technique is not taught in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, or boxing.

In freestyle, we also worked on ankle-pick which is not done in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, Kepap, judo, or boxing.

In shuai jiao wrestling we practiced jacket grabbing drills. These techniques are not taught in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, Kepap, catch wrestling, submission wrestling, boxing, or Brazilian jujitsu.

In kepap class the students were learning how to execute a knife attack. Offensive knife fighting is never taught in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, catch wrestling, boxing, sambo, submission wrestling, judo, or Brazilian jujitsu.

In Catch wrestling we were learning knee and ankle submissions. These techniques are forbidden, and thus not taught, in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, boxing, or judo.

In sambo we were learning knee compression submissions. These are not taught in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, Kepap, judo, or boxing.

In submission wrestling we worked on turtle defense and reversing an opponent who was turttled up, so you could get the pin. Turtle position doesn’t exist in san da, shuai jiao wrestling, Kepap, or boxing.

In judo we learned how to use the opponent’s gi top to choke him. This is not practiced in: san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, Kepap, catch wrestling, submission wrestling, or boxing.

In boxing training, my coach, Paddy Carson, was helping me improve the rhythm of my three-punch combinations. Punching isn’t taught in Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, catch wrestling, submission wrestling, judo, or Brazilian jujitsu.

At Brazilian jujitsu class we were learning spider guard. These skills are not taught in san da, Greco-Roman wrestling, freestyle wrestling, shuai jiao wrestling, catch wrestling, or boxing.

Styles clearly exist. For this reason, to be a complete fighter, one must study multiple STYLES.

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
The Monk from Brooklyn, the book which gave Antonio his name, and all of his other books, the book available at amazon.com. His book, Warrior Odyssey, chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia, including stories about Khmer and Vietnamese martial arts as well as the war in Burma and the Shan State Army, is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brooklyn-Monk/152520701445654?fref=ts
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com
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Paddy’s Fight Club 2015 (Parts 1 and 3)

In Uncategorized on August 3, 2015 at 1:06 am

Paddy Carson has always believed that boxing fundamentals were the cornerstone of fighting. Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo, began training at the original Paddy’s Fight Club, under the Japanese bridge, in Phnom Penh, back in 2004. The club has changed and developed over the years. Now, Paddy even has MMA fighters training in his club which was already famous for Khmer boxing and western boxing. In this video catch a special appearance by grappling coach Alan Mccune. But whether the guys are fighting in boxing, kick boxing, or MMA, Paddy believes the most important element of a fight is having good boxing fundamentals.

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Paddy Carson has been Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo’s boxing coach for more than a decade. While overcoming cancer, Paddy was forced to have the bones in his leg removed and replaced with titanium. After completing physiotherapy, in the true spirit of Bushido, Paddy returned to work as a boxing coach, getting in the ring every day and taking his pros on the pads. After a pad session at Paddy’s Fight Club, Phnom Penh, Paddy, a second dan kyokushin black belt, challenged the Monk to a kyokushin-style, bare knuckle, body- blow sparring session. In the Monk’s own words, “Paddy’s sparring was heroic. Mine was comical.” Only one phrase comes to mind when you see a man of Paddy’s age, a cancer survivor, missing one leg, beat the crap out of a Brooklyn Monk, twenty years his junior, who outweighs him by fifteen or twenty kilograms, FULL RESPECT!
Watch on Youtube: Paddy’s Fight Club 2015 (Part 1)

Watch it on Youtube: Paddy’s Fight Club 2015 (Part 2 )

Watch it on Youtube: Paddy’s Fight Club 2015 (Part 3)

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Email Antonio
Antonio@speakingadventure.com
website
http://www.speakingadventure.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk: Full Respect

In Uncategorized on July 11, 2015 at 4:18 pm

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Paddy Carson has been Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo’s boxing coach for more than a decade. While overcoming cancer, Paddy was forced to have the bones in his leg removed and replaced with titanium. After completing physiotherapy, in the true spirit of Bushido, Paddy returned to work as a boxing coach, getting in the ring every day and taking his pros on the pads. After a pad session at Paddy’s Fight Club, Phnom Penh, Paddy, a second dan kyokushin black belt, challenged the Monk to a kyokushin-style, bare knuckle, body- blow sparring session. In the Monk’s own words, “Paddy’s sparring was heroic. Mine was comical.” Only one phrase comes to mind when you see a man of Paddy’s age, a cancer survivor, missing one leg, beat the crap out of a Brooklyn Monk, twenty years his junior, who outweighs him by fifteen or twenty kilograms, FULL RESPECT!
Watch: Brooklyn Monk: Full Respect

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Email Antonio
Antonio@speakingadventure.com
website
http://www.speakingadventure.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk in 3D
Order the download at http://3dguy.tv/brooklyn-monk-in-3d/

Foreigners confused about money in Phnom Penh

In Uncategorized on June 10, 2015 at 2:44 am

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By Antonio Graceffo

At a foreign restaurant/bar, in Phnom Penh, I witnessed some middle-aged western men vainly trying to persuade a friend of mine, who is a security manager, to get them jobs as security guards. The scene was so pathetic, and raised a number of questions. Why were they here? Why were they broke? Why didn’t they know that foreigners can’t work as security guards? Why didn’t they know that the money they were spending in the bar that night would equal about half a month’s wage for the job they were trying to get?

Cambodia, like Thailand, is full of foreigners with no money, looking for jobs or “opportunities” if they present themselves, and desperate enough to get suckered into any sort of nonsense. I have seen more than one foreigner tell me they were going to come to Cambodia and work in a security company. Security is a huge business in Cambodia, but they only hire Khmer guards, and pay them $85-$130 USD per month. They don’t need or even want you. A foreigners’ lack of Khmer language skills would be a huge impediment to the work of a security guard. The same goes for foreigners who want to come here and work in a restaurant or do some other low-level job. Foreign chefs can be paid fairly well. But they are bringing skills which locals may not have. But the salary for a common restaurant worker is between $85-$120 a month, for a ten-hour shift, 28 days a month.

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Other people tell me they want to come here and train in martial arts, offering their labor cleaning the school, in exchange for training. The local trainers are extremely poor and they need your money, not your labor. Your labor, cleaning the school, is worth about $3 a day. But that job can also be done by any of the Khmer students, for free, making you a redundant Whiteman.

Next, they think they will come here and work as trainers at fight gyms, in a country where the national sport is kick boxing. There are only about 5 gyms in Phnom Penh, and they already have their trainers in place. Others think they will start some sort of business, which entails a lot of lunches in restaurants, a lot of meetings, nights in bars, a lot of talk, and no actual business or money.

There are a few good jobs here. For example, teaching in an international school pays well, anywhere in the world. But you have to be qualified. You need a master degree, experience, a teaching license, letters of recommendation, and specific international school experience. But these are not the people who are contacting me about working here. NGO work can pay extremely well, but you have to have a skill that they need. And many will not hire locally. Remember, this is a country where foreign doctors and medical specialists from top hospital often work for free. You have to be hired from overseas. Basically, the rule of thumb is if you are a zero back home, if you find it impossible to earn a living in a rich country with a vibrant economy, where you were born, where you know people, where you speak the language, and have the legal right to work, don’t come to a poor country, with high unemployment and incredibly low wages, offering them NOTHING, and hoping to earn more than locals.

Dith Pran
Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
The Monk from Brooklyn, the book which gave Antonio his name, and all of his other books, the book available at amazon.com. His book, Warrior Odyssey, chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia, including stories about Khmer and Vietnamese martial arts as well as the war in Burma and the Shan State Army, is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brooklyn-Monk/152520701445654?fref=ts
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk: Cambodia National Judo Team (Parts 1-3 )

In Uncategorized on May 18, 2015 at 12:37 pm

Kru Lach Vuthy, head coach of the Cambodia National Judo Team grappling coach of the Cambodian Ultimate Fighter like TV show, Khmer Warrior Champion (KWC) teaches Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo, some judo techniques. Antonio is a PhD candidate writing his dissertation on Chinese wrestling. But his research has recently lead him to judo, as a related grappling art.
Watch Cambodia National Judo Team (Part 1) on youtube:

Watch Cambodia National Judo Team (Part 2) on youtube:

Watch Cambodia National Judo Team (Part 3) on youtube:

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Email Antonio
Antonio@speakingadventure.com
website
http://www.speakingadventure.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

MMA Talk on Radio One Cambodia (Parts 1 through 4)

In Uncategorized on March 5, 2015 at 4:52 am

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Radio host, Aaron Matthew Leverton, talks to KWC MMA coach, Alan Mccune, and Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo, about MMA, wrestling, judo, boxing, fighting and other manly stuff on Radio One, Phnom Penh Cambodia

Watch MMA Talk on Radio One Cambodia (Part 1) http://youtu.be/-VXU3_K2ms0

Watch MMA Talk on Radio One Cambodia (Part 2) http://youtu.be/qTRmkKE_Gws

Watch MMA Talk on Radio One Cambodia (Part 3) http://youtu.be/FWmWe9KQwNI

Watch MMA Talk on Radio One Cambodia (Part 4) http://youtu.be/If72iIT5TIc

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
The Monk from Brooklyn, the book which gave Antonio his name, and all of his other books, the book available at amazon.com. His book, Warrior Odyssey, chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia, including stories about Khmer and Vietnamese martial arts as well as the war in Burma and the Shan State Army, is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Not Fruit Coffee!

In Uncategorized on November 14, 2014 at 3:04 am

By Antonio Graceffo

I walked into a chain coffee shop in Phnom Penh, read their offerings of over-priced over-fancy coffee drinks with exotic names, which cost more than the daily wage of the person preparing them, and asked. “Do you have plain brewed coffee?” The barista asked, “Fruit coffee?”
“No, brewed coffee. Do you have brewed coffee?”
“Fruit coffee?” He asked again, scanning the menu.
“No, fruit coffee doesn’t exist. I am asking if you have brewed coffee.” I repeated.
Another worker walked over and asked the barista, “What does he want?” The barista answered, “He keeps asking for fruit coffee.”
“NOT FRUIT COFFEE!” I shouted. “Brewed coffee, B-R-E-W-E-D coffee.”
When they mentioned fruit coffee again, I just gave-in and ordered an Americano. After I sat down to drink my Americano, I thought for a moment. This was probably the only café any of them had been in. As a result, the only coffee drinks they have ever heard of or know exist are the ones on this café’s menu. They had no way of knowing there is such a thing as a plain brewed coffee.

In the developing world, whether it be Cambodia or even wealthy China, you have to remind yourself that the hotel worker may never have slept in a hotel. The waitress may never have eaten in a restaurant. And the barista may not know the simple joys of a fruit coffee.

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Warning to Hippies and Penniless Westerners Travelling to Phnom Penh

In Uncategorized on June 16, 2014 at 12:09 pm

By Antonio Graceffo

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poverty kids BW

Warning to idiotic budget travelers from the world’s richest countries: Please don’t come to Cambodia with no money. I get email every week from people who want to come to Cambodia and train. About 30% of them are so deluded, I want to just post this, copy, paste and share, once and for all, to head off the stupid questions.

Please don’t write to me and ask me where you can get a well paying job in Cambodia, to pay for your training. It’s a poor country. Wages are well below the cost of living and jobs are few and hard to get. If you have real skills, you can apply to an NGO or an international company to do a real job, which a local can’t. But there are no casual jobs that pay well. And apart from casual teaching, I don’t know of casual jobs at all. Please don’t offer to work, clean the school, or teach English or martial arts in exchange for training, room, and board. Your labor is worth $3 a day. Room and board is worth $30. It’s not a good deal for the locals. Besides which, the people who teach martial arts are poor. They need you to pay your training fees so they can eat.

If you really want a local job, a factory job here would pay about $150 USD a month, for working 11 hours per day, 28 days a month. I get a commission for each overseas worker I recruit. So, let me know if you are interested.

Don’t tell me you are a vegan or have some sort of made-up, self-imposed dietary restrictions. The locals don’t have enough to eat. Telling them you intentionally pass up certain foods would be like laughing at their poverty. The food I eat here is often dirty and of questionable origin, but I am happy to have it. And I know a lot of locals who would love to eat for a whole day what a person from a first world country eats in a single meal.

And don’t ask me about your stupid dog. NO! You can’t bring your dog to Cambodia. (Antonio’s Law, number 141606) It is inhumane to chemically knock out your dog in Israel or Belgium or New Jersey, put it in a crate, and fly 23 hours to Cambodia. Once you get here, we travel everywhere on motorcycles. This wouldn’t be safe or maybe not even possible with a dog. Obviously the overwhelming majority of hotels won’t accept you with a dog. And since you are coming with no money and want to stay in the cheapest places, this reduces your options to almost zero. The cheapest option for a long term training stay is to negotiate and sleep in the school. But that is something you can’t do with your dog.

I think people from the west need to decide if they are rich or poor. If you are rich, live rich, and pay rich. If you are poor, live poor, and pay poor. But you can’t come to a developing country and expect to pay poor and live rich.

Please feel free to repost this to anyone who you think it might help.

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Martial Arts Odyssey, Inside Khmer Bokator

In Martial Arts on November 15, 2007 at 5:11 am

New, In Depth Bokator Video on Youtube

By Dante Scott

  

This is the first production video ever done about the Khmer Martial art of Bokator. It stars Grand Master San Kim Saen and features Antonio Graceffo. The narration is provided by Antonio and is the most thorough explanation of the origin and spirit of Bokator to date. The video production was done part by a local company, in Cambodia and part by Soso Whaley, the producer of Martial Arts Odyssey.

 

Martial Arts Odyssey is the youtube show hosted by Antonio Graceffo, adventure and martial arts author. The show follows Antonio around Asia, as he trains with masters of ancient and sometimes lost arts, and as he tries to discover the perfect martial art.

 

Antonio had this to say about his participation in the show. “Life is a journey of development. The road I have chosen is martial arts. The show gives me an opportunity to share my path with people from around the world.”

 

Khmer people and martial arts fans from have already begun writing in, leaving comments and encouragement. To find out more about Bokator, take a look

 

http://youtube.com/watch?v=LJQA6P4xzCo

 

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