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Foreign Education in China

In Uncategorized on February 28, 2014 at 2:01 pm

By Antonio Graceffo

Nearly one million Chinese students registered for classes at American universities during the 2012-2013 academic year, says an article in US News and World Report. But with tuition fees for foreign students of $38,000 or more per year, education in the US is way out of reach for the average Chinese family. The solution that China has found is to move the foreign education to China. Foreign universities have opened campuses and joint venture programs across the country, using the English language to teach degree subjects. The schools are still considerably more expensive than a domestic university, but much cheaper than going abroad. A bachelor’s degree at University of Nottingham, Ningbo Campus costs $14,000 USD, for example, whereas a BA at Shanghai University would cost only about $3,200 USD.
Some of the foreign universities who currently have programs in China include: New York University, Shanghai Campus, Duke-Kunshan University-Wuhan University, John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, Nanjing Campus, University of Birmingham Guangzhou Centre, and Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou to name a few.
A deep respect for education has always been a major feature of Chinese culture. In the past, however the educational options open to many families were limited by the family’s income. Over the last 10 years, however, Chinese families have been earning more and more. According to a report by Accenture the average hourly wage in China has increased from less than one dollar per hour in 2005, to approximately $2.25 an hour in 2011, with the average annual income in 2012 rising to about $2,100. Much of that money is being pumped into education. Some of these families save for years and years to send their children to a foreign university program in China. But the foreign programs are especially popular with China’s wealthy class. According to the Hurun Wealth Report of 2012, “One out of every 1300 people in China has a million yuan or more”. Leaving them with savings large enough to fund a foreign education inside or outside of China.
Since 1978, China has had a one child policy. With life expectancy steadily increasing in the new, affluent China, this often leaves four living grandparents and two parents with only one child to support. This means the life savings of six adults could be pooled to pay for the education of one child. The increased income, combined with a one child policy has left a tremendous number of families in a position to pay for a foreign university program.
University of Technology Sydney, in cooperation with Sydney Institute of Language and Commerce operates a program at Shanghai University. This is one of many foreign programs which doesn’t actually offer a foreign degree in China. Students who complete the program in China get a certificate. But students who complete a two-plus-two program, two years in China followed by two in Australia, receive a university degree from UTS. Another option is that the students can complete their BA from Shanghai university concurrently with two years at SILC, then go to Australia and complete a second BA. These types of programs have made a foreign education even more affordable, since the first two years are done in China. This leaves parents to pay for only two years of study abroad.
Karen, a second-year student in the UTS, SILC program explained why the program appeals to Chinese students, “First of all I can get two degrees, one from China, and one from the foreign university which benefits me interviewing for a job.”
In an informal survey, the two most common reasons students gave for studying in the hybrid program were to improve their English and to prepare to study abroad.
“My friend and my parents both think it is a good way to improve English. But my parents may worry if the courses we studied whether can be adapted to the situation in china.” Said one student. “Because I want to improve my English and I can be better adapted to the foreign study style if I go abroad for further study.” Said another.
“First because of study abroad, my parents want me study in SILC. Also this program is cheaper than going abroad for studies. More cross nation companies setup in China currently. They need more employee with a broad and good command of English to deal with foreign business. So study in SILC will help me to get a god job after graduation.”
Whether students do the full four years abroad or do half in China and half in a foreign country, they still need to adjust to the dramatic differences between western and Chinese education.
Another SILC student commented on the differences between Western and Chinese teaching styles. “There’s not so many instructions given by western teachers. We have to study individually and initiatively, which is quite different from Chinese pattern. Also studying speed is very fast, since we have three semesters per year.”
During a series of student interviews, responses like this were very common. “I think the most difficult thing is the deference between Chinese and foreign teacher patterns are hard to adapt to. Sometimes the customs of how to teach in class, what kind of homework to do differ. Class is quite different from I used to do as a Chinese student.”
The foreign teachers also found that teaching Chinese students was different than teaching in the West. One teacher, Rada, said “Chinese kids are more respectful. Teachers are important here. But it is more challenging to get them to speak and participate.” She went on to say, “It’s like pulling teeth.”
An American teacher, Niko had this to say, “The biggest challenge is that they are taught never to question anything. But in western education you have to question, analyze, and debate.”
Rada, “Parents put pressure on the kids. They are motivated not only to make money, but also to make their parents proud. Avoiding shame seems to be a huge part of the culture.”

In the English language programs teachers often complain that they have to demand less of the Chinese students. “The expectations are much lower here than they would be in an English speaking country. We have to go slower and dumb down the course, if you will.”
In addition to the English language programs, which seem to be the largest and most well established, there are a smattering of programs sponsored by Germany, France or other countries, using other languages as the medium of instruction. One student in an English program explained, “The other foreign programs in our school UTSEUS (a program offered through a French university) it’s often a little tired since they have to learn French, which they never studied before.” Many of the English medium programs require that students pass the IELTS exam either before or during the course. But the European programs couldn’t make such demands because there are so few Chinese students who have had the opportunity to study German or French till fluency.
As a result, a French engineering teacher complained, in very broken English, “The students understand nothing about I say. So, I am have to speak English for teach my class.”
Apart from the language issues, foreign and Chinese universities are very different. Chinese education is largely focused on rote memorization. The best students are those who can most dutifully and correctly repeat what they have heard from the teachers. Students also work in study groups, sharing notes and assignments. This is in sharp contrast to Western education which values critical thinking, individuality, and original thought. One student had this to say, “The requirement in a foreign program is too different form the study style in my previous study. Such as presentation and discussion these things are not common in high school.”
Many of the students complain about the difficulty of dealing with both the language and the unfamiliar classes. “We must learn many major courses. And academic English in such a short time. It is also a challenge to pass. And my friends in other programs do not have to pass IELTS.” Students in foreign programs often commiserated with friends who were studying in other foreign programs. “I have a friend studying Shanghai Jiao Tong University, majoring in Michigan program. They had to pass the TOEFL so that they could go to Michigan to finish their bachelor’s degree. And their courses are hard.” Another girl said, “I have friends in western Liverpool University, China. They say that Liverpool is expensive. European schools have too many activities and lessons…too busy.”
As much as the students were aware of the benefits of the foreign program, many of them didn’t choose the program themselves.
Giles, a teacher at SILC explained how the students came into the program. “Parents simply tell them what to do and what to study. You don’t know how many kids have told me ‘I would prefer to study nuclear physics or anything but completely unrelated to business.’ But parents made them study business because this is where they believe the kids can make money.”
Niko said, “There is a belief in the society that parents know best. And you always do what parents tell you. Even their peers would tell them to listen to their parents, which is very different from the west.” Niko went on to say, “They are taught by parents that education is important, and part of Chinese culture. And this is true, regardless of class. In other countries it may be class. But here, it is everyone.”
Most of the foreign programs are business related. Business and technology seem to be the two choices that Chinese parents agree on.
Niko said, “The Chinese are focused on education as a tool for social mobility. They mostly study business or engineering. You don’t get a lot of Chinese kids studying philosophy or liberal arts. If they are studying something else, it is most likely because they didn’t have the scores to get into business and engineering.”
Parents in the new China are willing to spend a fortune on their children’s education because they see it as an investment. They hope that investing in a business or technology degree will return real dividends. Unfortunately, however, data shows that Chinese university graduates have increased six fold in recent years. New grads are facing a tighter job market and low wages. A graduate from a $140,000 USD education in the US will be returning to a China where the average income is just over $2,000 a year. And yet, each year, the number of students opting to go abroad for studies or to study in the local, international university programs increases dramatically.

Antonio Graceffo is the author of the Monk from Brooklyn, Warrior Odyssey, and several other books about Asia. He lives in China, where he is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of Sport.
Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

How Can We Train When the Gym is Burning?

In Uncategorized on February 28, 2014 at 11:39 am

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By Antonio Graceffo

My gym caught fire tonight. Just as I was finishing my workout, I smelled a wood fire, but didn’t think anything of it. I walked into the locker room, and it was completely full of smoke. I am such a New Yorker, in spite of the fact that I could neither breath, nor see, I considered taking a shower, before going home. When the firemen came in, I decided it would have been awkward to be naked, while they were working with their hoses, so I grabbed all my stuff out of my locker, and started toward the door. That’s when I realized you can only go so long without breathing. Then, the lights went out. I made it to the front desk, where everyone had congregated. I overheard some Chinese people saying the elevator was shut down. That made sense, but then, I didn’t know how to get out of the building. I took off my wrestling shoes and put on my street clothes.
Then it hit me that I didn’t see anyone leaving. Being that this was China, I could imagine there were no emergency exits. A worker came with a flashlight to help me get dressed. When I was done, I asked him how to get out. “You want to get out?” He asked in Chinese, as if he hadn’t thought that possible. “Yes, I would like to leave the burning building.” I said. By this time, the smoke was filling the reception area. He led me out a backdoor, past a fire wall and to an emergency elevator.
While we waited for the elevator he said in English, “I sorry this.” A midst the heat and smoke, and in the dim glow of his flashlight, I scolded him, and told him everyone has to talk to me in Chinese. It might have cost me my life, but I stick to my principles.
As I got in the elevator, I realized I was the only person leaving. I can’t imagine that in Chinese culture you just remain in the burning building…Chinese fire drill?
I kept remembering that Italian sea captain a few years back who was criticized by American media for getting in the first lifeboat, leaving all the passengers behind. In the interview he said, “I tell the people to leave. If they like to stay, that’s their business.”

Thankfully, I got out alive. Not sure about the woman I knocked down on the stairs. The police are claiming that she did get out of the fire alive. But my story is that she was already trampled to death BEFORE she got on the stairs.

Does anyone want to buy a slightly scorched gym membership?

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

美国体育学校体育训练

In Uncategorized on February 28, 2014 at 12:39 am

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指 导 教 师 戴国斌
研究生 姓名 安东尼 (Antonio Graceffo)
学号_1310104008___
Antonio_graceffo@hotmail.com
标题 体育教育在美国: 在地球上最胖的国家收到的奥运奖牌
美国体育教育广大市民失败,但仍然产生冠军的运动员

报告摘要

美国是在世界上最胖的国家。有很大比例的成人和儿童患上肥胖症。物理教育学校的标准已经稳步下降,与计划减少或取消。附加,不像其他许多国家的政府,美国政府有没有权力来支配体育在学校教育或训练的运动员。有了这样的体质较差的教育和这么多的肥胖,如何美国如此上佳表现在奥运会?

美国卫生和体育教育的可怕的状态

根据2012年的一份报告对成人肥胖,美国政府的疾病预防控制中心,“超过三分之一(35.7%)的美国成年人属于肥胖。”报告解释与超重相关的健康风险。 “肥胖相关条件,
包括心脏疾病,中风,2型糖尿病和某些类型的癌症,一些可预防死亡的首要原因。”
不亚于美国的成年人超重,孩子们也面临着类似的健康问题。由国家联盟儿童肥胖研究(NCCOR)的一份报告发现,“近三分之一的青少年超重或肥胖。”报告接着说,“这是2300多万儿童和青少年。”

据在美国的学校体育课的数量减少到2012年的纽约时报的文章, “美国疾病控制和预防中心在6月报道,近一半(学生)说,他们没有体育课平均一个星期。 ” (贝克2012年)相同的文章接着说,在纽约市,20.5 %的孩子表示,
他们平均一个星期有没有物理教育。问题发生在整个国家。 : “在其它部分的国家,
根据同一篇文章中,研究人员在该大学的加州,旧金山,发现仅有20 %的小学 学校在旧金山的系统被满足国家的要求:每天20分钟。”其他的例子从文章告诉没有健身facities ,谁支付,外培训,指导孩子们每周一次,在“外面的操场。 ”阴雨天,
他们不能行使所有的学校。杰夫•恩格尔,在皇后区长岛市高中的副校长,在文章中引述的话说,“有没有出现是一个推广,或支持,在我们的许多日常的物理教育从教育厅高中。 “
美国今天报道说,“只有约一半的美国孩子们满足了政府的体力活动指引做轰轰烈烈或中等强度的体力活动至少60分钟,每天,”(2013黑尔米希)“在许多学校,物理教育类和凹已被挤掉,因为增加的教育需求和严峻的经济时代。“

一个纽约时报“的一篇文章竟然说”儿童肥胖已经成为一个国家的医疗危机。“(2006年伦道夫)。文章指责大食品,这意味着的大coporations销售非常不健康的食物,肥胖问题至少部分。垃圾食品,饼干,糖果,零食,汽水,甜谷物的广告显示在动画片和儿童节目。“在1970年,美国联邦贸易委员会提出禁止或严格限制所有的电视广告对儿童的规则。”(2006年伦道夫),但禁止在美国的广告,往往是困难的,因为法律保证自由贸易,主要是政府限制。

除了从电视广告,创造儿童垃圾食品的需求,另一个问题是,现在在学校出售快餐。 “根据2005年的一份报告由政府问责办公室,83%的小学,97%的中学和99%的高中从自动售货机或学校商店出售垃圾食品。” “平均每天不到一半的美国儿童(45%),
在所有吃任何水果,根据公共利益科学中心”。另一个问题是 高果糖玉米糖浆,
在许多食品中使用的甜味剂,因为它是比糖更便宜。营养学家建议,高果糖玉米糖浆,
这是出现在各类食品中,是一种隐形的原因,美国人越来越胖。“

快餐吸引低收入家庭的家长甚至比新鲜的水果和蔬菜,因为它是便宜。但是,有关快餐往往是很难找到。在美国,有严格的法律,在超市出售的食品标签,使消费者可以知道有多少的热量和营养量。但是,根据文章,“在餐馆的食品标签标签在超市远远落后。”不幸的是,很多家长本身是肥胖和健康的生活不是很了解。“许多健康专家认为电脑和电视对孩子的健康问题。 “屏幕时间已被指责助长了国家的疫情。
美国有三分之一的孩子是超重或肥胖。“(Madison)

据一份报告由哈佛大学公共卫生学院“,在美国,平均每天看电视的时间约五小时的人,”(哈佛大学公共卫生学院)有趣的是,很多专家指责电视,电脑和视频游戏的日益严重的肥胖问题,因为这些活动促进了久坐不动的生活方式。但是哈佛报告需要一个稍微不同的观点,“看电视促进肥胖,通过改变主要是什么,有多少人吃,少改变多少,他们的移动。”(哈佛大学公共卫生学院的垃圾食品广告)

文章指出,不仅看电视减少儿童的活动,它也暴露了他们对垃圾食品和高热量的零食广告的事实。 “食品相关的电视广告,成千上万的儿童和青少年每年主要为高热量,
低营养的食物和饮料,”(哈佛大学公共卫生学院)观看更多的电视对健康更差。 “一直遵循儿童在很长一段时间的研究发现,孩子看电视,他们就越有可能获得多余的体重。”(哈佛大学公共卫生学院)

体育课的问题

“在美国威斯康星大学的研究人员的一项实验发现,老式的健身课程,时间服装改变和出席采取实战演练,大约只有25分钟是留给”(2006年伦道夫)据CBS新闻网站的一篇文章,“在美国,只有6%的学校提供每天的体育课”文章接着解释说,这个问题是金融。 “要启动体育课程序花费一所学校约50万美元。”(2009年Dakss)

在学校体育课的一个问题是,他们是罕见的或不存在的。另一个问题是浪费时间。体育课时间用于儿童换衣服,排队,回答作用通话,接受老师的指示,然后再准备设备,并开始玩游戏。这是所有的使用时间,让学生可以行使。 “研究人员报告说,
在典型的高中体育课 – 那里有一个半心半意的垒球比赛前的几个跳跃千斤顶 – 学生平均只有16分钟。”2006年(AP)。即使一小时的体育课不会导致在一个小时的运动。 “报告由美国康奈尔大学的研究人员还发现,加入200分钟,
每周体育课时间收效甚微。文章解释说,200分钟类OER星期才导致约7个半-8分钟,每天活动。 (AP2006)

在学术类,像数学或科学,学生参加考试和结果进行了分析。不幸的是,大多数的健身课程没有考试或评估的结果有意义。 “根据形状的民族,NASPE 和美国心脏协会的年度报告,只有15个州要求学生评估在体育教学中的最后一年。”(AP2006)

在学校体育教育

美国一直是非常成功的运动。他们赢得了更多的奥运奖牌比任何一个国家的历史,976枚金牌和2400枚奖牌总数。对于美国如何在训练的运动员,这样的成功创造了很多人的兴趣。美国体育教育系统体育教育在其他国家有很大的不同。在美国,学校教育,包括体育,是由州政府和地方学区管理。有一个很大的自主性,以及教育和体育教育的质量显着变化从一个到另一个司法管辖区。许多学校提供基本的体育类学生。“形状的州报告,由州运动和体育协会National Association for Sport and Physical Education(NASPE)
,指出:”没有联邦法律要求在美国学校的学生提供物理教育“上发表。”(NASPE第8页)大多数州,州政府设定的准则和最低标准。当地学区决定,以满足或超过这些标准。在一些州,甚至州政府有没有权力来支配。教育与体育教学的所有决定都是由当地学区。
(第11页)在这些州,相隔的距离只有几公里的学校教育,可能有完全不同的标准。
虽然美国政府不能强制学校体育教育水平,他们可以提出建议。美国卫生和人类服务部(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)对美国人的体力活动指南建议
“儿童和青少年(6-17岁),从事体力活动日报”(第11页)
在60分钟或更由于这仅仅是一个指引和州没有义务遵循这些建议,只有4/451(50个州加上波多黎各)要求学生参加体育课。只有3个州满足日常体育课的联邦指导方针。除了得到一些锻炼,体育课的目的之一是让儿童接触各种游戏。在课堂上,他们将发挥各种各样的体育比赛如橄榄球,篮球,棒球,也许田径。并非所有美国学校游泳池,但在有游泳池的学校,体育课也被用来教游泳和经常救生。学校体育课是美国最伟大的运动员进行培训。事实上,根据美国政府疾病预防控制中心,(Center for Disease Control)(CDC)在一份报告中对儿童肥胖,在2010年,18%的美国6-18岁的儿童为肥胖。

运动队训练

美国奥运会和专业的运动员来自学校和大学的运动队,数百万的美国青年,每天训练系统。美国奥运会和专业的运动员来自学校和大学的运动队,数百万的美国青年,每天训练系统。美国奥运会和专业的运动员来自学校和大学的运动队,数百万的美国青年,每天训练系统。根据2007-2008高中体育参与调查的调查由全国工商联州高中协会(National Federation of State High School associations)(NFHS) 的700多万高中学生参加在学校的运动队。根据国家大学生体育协会 (THE NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ) (NCAA),“学生运动员参与报告”近50万名学生参加大学竞技。
与中国和许多其他国家不同,美国没有一个系统的体育学校和体育大学。相反,学校和大学都有自己的运动队。运动员出席其他学生相同的学术类。但是,当类完成后,他们参加在各自的运动训练。高中运动员每天训练2个小时左右。大学生运动员每天训练4个小时左右。大多数美国大学提供20个运动项目。在高中水平,最流行的运动是橄榄球,播放超过100万的高中男生。其他九个男生最流行的运动是篮球,田径场,棒球,足球,摔跤,越野跑步,高尔夫球,网球,游泳和潜水。女孩最流行的运动是篮球,近一个半百万的美国高中女生扮演。其他女生最流行的运动是田径,排球,垒球,足球,越野跑步,网球,游泳和潜水,有竞争力的啦啦队,高尔夫球。
没有美国政府机构负责在美国的运动。但总统的体育健身和体育理事会一起工作,卫生和人类服务秘书提醒所有美国人的总统运动,健康,健身。他们提出建议州政府。但最终,它是州政府或当地学区控制运动训练。竞技体育均受捐助和赠款,从企业所支持的非政府组织。美国奥林匹克委员会管辖美国参加奥运会,并促进电枢运动一般。
高中体育

州高中协会全国联合会The National Federation of State High School Associations(NFHS),私人机构,负责高中体育。根据他们的网站,他们负责监督“为男孩和女孩的竞争18,500高的学校和超过11万学生参与运动和活动方案的16个体育项目。”虽然这份报告将集中在高中和大学的田径,重要的是要指出的是,从美国奥运代表队的成员或专业运动员的选择,实际的游泳池大得多。据NFHS11万高中孩子在玩耍的高中体育队。但是,运动,如滑冰, 拳击,或骑马,或例如,一般不打高中队。因此,谁的孩子玩这些运动的私人训练。
此数据仅包括高中体育,没有初中或小学。此数目也排除了许多民办学校有自己的体育执行机构。这个数字不包括其他类型的有组织的运动队,如教堂,社区,企业或联盟足球,棒球,垒球,排球或其他运动也发挥高学龄儿童。总部设在美国小联盟 Little League,例如,棒球和垒球联赛,声称自己是在世界上最大的体育联盟。根据他们的网站,他们负责为200,000棒球和垒球团队
由于每个国家和每个学区都有很大的自主权,在美国各地的运动队的训练和比赛,这是很难一概而论。因此,我们可以作为一个例子,一个典型的学区,田纳西州沙利文县(Sullivan县,田纳西州)。区包括5高的学校对体育彼此竞争。他们也有三所高中橄榄球L,游泳,足球,篮球,田径,越野,网球,棒球,垒球,排球邻县竞争。区比赛获胜的球队将继续在竞争中截面,州,地区和全国冠军。
联检组美国网游泳谢晖去漪汾保皋,包括高中,大学和其他有竞争力的球队在美国有超过1,000,000竞技游泳运动员从这个庞大的数字,只有约60项奥运游泳队将选择

以田纳西州为例,再次在美国田纳西州,高中体育管理由田纳西州中学田径协会(TSSAA),中学(初中)体育管理由田纳西州中学体育协会(TMSAA)
TSSAA是一个成员州高中协会(NFHS)的全国工商联和会遵守与NFHS规则和法规,使来自田纳西州的高中运动员将能够推进国家,区域和全国冠军。
大学体育

美国高中队的最佳运动员将角逐美国大学队的位置上,在美国大学。大学通常提供两个品种的运动队:校内和大学。校内队有些非正式和运动员压力较小执行。校内的团队可以代表一个学术部门,如艺术学院可能有一个垒球或从生物科学学院的发挥对球队足球队。团队还可以来自校园俱乐部和联谊会。校内运动队往往是竞争力较弱,所有的包容性,让学生有机会,有乐趣和得到一些锻炼,同时竞争。校内体育活动提供了一个更广泛的各种体育比正规大学队。

例如在中田纳西州立大学(MTSU),的,50个校内活动报价。 “通过参加这些团队和个人的运动,我们为您提供技能发展,更好的健康,缓解压力,增强社会,体育和友好的竞争的机会。 “(MTSU校内网页)。有些运动是季节性的,但在2013年秋季学期,MTSU提供的:户外户外极限飞盘,排球,足球,室内棒球,网球,垒球,壁球,高尔夫球,5K运行,玉米洞锦标赛 ( Corn Hole Tourney),马鞋,
草地保龄球,Spikeball,蹴鞠,战舰,旗橄榄球 ( Flag Football) ,激光标签,旗橄榄球,
室内足球,室内排球,台球,乒乓球,橄榄球,篮球,和Wallyball

在除了壁间球队,大学也有大学体育队。这些团队通常是非常困难的加盟。运动员一般要通过一个漫长的选择过程中,或者被邀请加入我们的团队。这些运动员获得奖学金,以帮助支付学业,学费,住宿费,学习材料。这些队伍的训练是艰苦的,每周20小时的培训,并参加强制性比赛的运动员。运动员可以开除出队,未能出席的做法,或缺乏在比赛中的表现。如果开除出队,运动员通常会失去他的财务奖学金。仍然有资格打NCAA运动员认可的大学体育必须保持一个电枢运动员。他不能收到钱玩的运动。他必须维持一个令人满意的平均等级分和,赚取每学期至少12个学分。根据在CNN Money.com的一篇文章,在2011-2012学年,美国大学的平均成本为每年15,000美元。
享受体育奖学金往往是大学生运动员能买得起出席大学的唯一途径。(Clark)

大学体育的主要制裁机构是全国大学生体育协会(NCAA),国家间的竞技协会(NAIA)和国家初级学院运动协会(NJCAA)。根据NCAA参与报告,450,000名学生参加运动队在NCAA在横跨美国大学。 MTSU,例如提供以下大学体育男士:棒球, 篮球, 越野, 橄榄球, 高尔夫球, 网球, 跟踪, 女装:篮球, 越野, 高尔夫球, 足球, 垒球, 网球, 跟踪, 排球

奥运会选拔运动员

在美国系统初中学校四川体育送入高中体育与高中体育送入高校体育与高校体育进入奥运会和职业联赛饲料。当谈到艇员选拔奥运选手,这个系统是一个非常强大的选择装置。下面是一个例子取自摔跤。

高中摔跤加上大学学院摔跤“添加了来自不同机构的参与程度在美国大学摔跤 – NCAA (全国大学生体育协会) ,全国委员会(全国大学生摔跤协会) , NJCAA (国家初级学院运动协会) – 约8,400摔跤手,从223支球队,竞争在某种形式的校际摔跤。 “这意味着有超过一百万在美国,谁最终将被配对的摔跤手一季度,经过多年艰苦的淘汰赛,获得美国奥运摔跤队的约20个点。

学院体育后的生活

体育大学系统与国家不同,美国大学运动员参加正常的,学术的,大学和主修任何科目教学,工程,计算机科学,法语文学,或任何东西,他们的利益。大多数大学生运动员不会使它的职业联赛。其实根据一个合议运动员成为一名专业的机会百分比一篇关于,机会一般都小于2%,“只有一个运动(棒球)有超过2%的NCAA的球员走亲”。(曼弗雷德•2012) 。
幸运的是,即使是运动员谁不成为专业人士,有生命的职业选择。根据NCAA的“毕业成功率的数据,82%的司公布的数据,我新生奖学金的学生运动员,谁在2004年进入大学获得了学位。在二部中,73%的大一新生,在2004年进入大学的学生运动员毕业了。“(NCAA.COM)

职业体育

根据运动,一些美国学校或大学运动员的梦想是成为一名奥运会选手,一个专业的,或两者兼而有之。在美国四大联赛是全国篮球协会(NBA),美国国家橄榄球联盟(NFL),美国职棒大联盟(MLB),全国冰球联盟(NHL)均享有广泛的电视和媒体报道。用钱代言,赞助商,商品,门票销售,这四个联盟是财政上最成功的世界之中。美国职业足球大联盟(MLS)是不是很经济成功的,但在售出的彩票数目方面,匹配或超过了NBA和NHL。据“福布斯”杂志“MLS”狂热的球迷基础的一篇文章中是增长最快的任何运动,在2001年至2011年以及2002年至2012年的十年期间,超过了所有其他人。“(”福布斯“杂志2013年11月8日)

在美国,在各大体育专业运动队都拥有专营权。这是真正的棒球,篮球,足球,曲棍球,现在,足球,等等。专营权一般与特定的城市,例如,芝加哥公牛篮球队,纽约扬基棒球队。有些城市有一个以上的专营权。例如,美国也有大都会。谁玩这些职业联赛的运动员大部分来自学校和大学的运动员池。
专业运动队的选拔和招聘不同运动运动。一些运动保持青春的联赛,那里的年轻人得到培养和发挥体育,磨炼自己的技能,希望有朝一日转专业的机会。其他的运动项目,如橄榄球,使用草稿系统。草案中,球队轮流选择的球员。一旦玩家被选为某个团队,没有其他球队可以提供给他一份合同。棒球和曲棍球和篮球小联盟球队选择球员。小联盟的球队和球员谁不再有资格为大学体育,但还没有好到可以选择的专业团队是一个半专业的游泳池。侦察系统也用在足球和篮球,专业球探遵循特定的球员,并确定他们足够的人才,为大学生团队或专业的团队发挥。

参考书目
American Softball Association, http://www.asasoftball.com/youth/
AP 2006, Teens Only Active in Gym Class for 16 Minutes, 9/19/2006
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/14908851

BAKER, A 2012, Despite Obesity Concerns, Gym Classes Are Cut, The New York Times,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/11/education/even-as-schools-battle-obesity-physical-education-is-sidelined.html?_r=0

Clark, K, How much does college actually cost?, CNN Money.com
http://money.cnn.com/101/college-101/college-cost.moneymag/index.htm
Center for Disease Control, Adolescent and School Health, Childhood Obesity Facts,
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/facts.htm

Center for Disease Control, Adult Obesity Facts, 2012 report, http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

DAKSS, B 2009, Obesity Up, Phys Ed Down, CBS News, February 11, 2009,
http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500199_162-669760.html

Forbes Staff, After Flirting With Failure, Major League Soccer Popularity Now Surging, Forbes Magazine online 11/08/2013 http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexmorrell/2013/11/08/after-flirting-with-failure-major-league-soccer-popularity-now-surging/
Harvard School of Public Health, Television Watching and “Sit Time” http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-causes/television-and-sedentary-behavior-and-obesity/

Hays, G 2013, TOUGH SELL FOR USA SOFTBALL PROGRAM, espnW.com
http://espn.go.com/espnw/news-commentary/article/9403429/espnw-usa-softball-struggling-retain-players
Hellmich, N2013, More PE, activity programs needed in schools, USA TODAY, May 23,2013http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2013/05/23/physical-education-schools/2351763/
Little League, http://www.littleleague.org
Madison, P Gaming Reality, CNN.com
http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2012/08/tech/gaming.series/obesity.html

MANFRED, T FEB. 10, 2012, Here Are The Odds That Your Kid Becomes A Professional Athlete, Business Insider
http://www.businessinsider.com/odds-college-athletes-become-professionals-2012-2

Middle Tennessee State University, MTSU Campus Recreation, Intramurals, Fall 2013 http://www.mtsu.edu/camprec/intramural/
National Association for Sport and Physical Education & American Heart Association. (2012). 2012 Shape of the Nation Report: Status of Physical Education in the USA. Reston, VA:

National Federation of State High School Associations, Indianapolis, IN, The 2007–2008 High School Athletics, Participation Survey (copyright); .
NCAA, THE NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, Student-Athlete Participation report, October 2012, Report Prepared By: Erin Irick, Assistant Director of Research, P.O. Box 6222, Indianapolis, Indiana 46206-6222, 317/917-6222, http://www.ncaa.org
NCAA, National Collegiate Athletic Association NCAA.COM, Eligibility, NCAA, 2012 About the NCAA Academics Rules Compliance Sport Science Institute, Understanding the Graduation Success Rate, http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Academics/Division+I/Graduation
NCCOR, National Coalition for Childhood Obesity Research, Childhood obesity is a serious U.S.
RANDOLPH, E 2006, The Big, Fat American Kid Crisis . . . and 10 Things We Should Do About It, New York Times, May 10, 2006
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/10/opinion/10talkingpoints.html
USA Baseball, http://web.usabaseball.com/about/
USA Swimming, 2012 Membership Demographics, USA Swimming, http://usaswimming.org
http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Eligibility/Remaining+Eligible/

KWC After Fight Interview 2 With the Brooklyn Monk

In Uncategorized on February 25, 2014 at 3:40 pm

SONY DSC

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KWC After Fight Interview 2 With the Brooklyn Monk
After fight interview at Khmer Warrior Champion, the Cambodian MMA reality TV show, where Kru Chan Reach and Antonio Graceffo were guest trainers, alongside regular KWC coach Allan Mccuen. Aaron Leverton conducts this fight recap interview in the cage at CTN TV.
Watch KWC After Fight Interview 2 With the Brooklyn Monk on Yuotube

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.
Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey
See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on http://www.blackbeltmag.com
Twitter
http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk
facebook
Brooklyn Monk fan page
Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE
http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1
Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)
http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Antonio,graceffo,Brooklyn,monk,camboda,khmer,china,shanghai,mma,martial,arts,odyssey,mixed.ctn,Cambodia,khmer,warrior,champion,kwc,TUF,chan,reach,fight,professional,interview,ultimate,aaron,leverton,ctn,tv,Cambodia,reality,mma,tv,show

Some memories never leave you

In Uncategorized on February 21, 2014 at 7:51 am

dad-1952

By Antonio Garceffo

When I visited my Pop in a fulltime care facility at Christmas, 2013, he didn’t remember who I was, straight away. My brother had to introduce me to him about every twenty minutes or so. He would remember for a while, and then ask again, who I was. My Pop is a Korean War era veteran, who served in the Air Force when the Air Force was only a few years old. He did his boot camp at Mitchel Air Force Base, the same place Charles Lindbergh took off from, when he made his historic solo flight across the Atlantic. After the base was closed, it became Nassau Community College, the first college I ever attended. When I went to school there, my dad was pleased that one of the original buildings had been converted to a Student Union hall. When I was a young kid and my Pop would tell me about his time in the military, he always sang the song “Waking up on Lollipop Hill.” Apparently his barracks was located on Lollipop Hill, and this was a marching song that the recruits sang. When you visit someone who is more or less demented and who doesn’t get out much, you run out of things to talk about, rather quickly. So, for no particular reason at all, I sang the one line of the song, which I remembered, “Waking up on Lollipop Hill.” My Pop instantly joined in and sang the next several lines. Boot camp is such a pivotal event in the lives of most young men, that even 60 years later, the memories were clear.

 

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.

Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey

See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk

facebook

Brooklyn Monk fan page

Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE

http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

And They Still offered me the Job

In Uncategorized on February 20, 2014 at 12:36 pm

ESL Teacher Blues

By Antonio Graceffo

Shanghai University offered me my old job back and even offered to work my teaching hours in such a way that I could continue with my studies, but the problem is that the two universities are just too far apart and it would be impossible to study and teach at the same time. The university where I study, Shanghai University of Sport, is also trying to put together a job for me, but until that happens, I decided to go take a job at a language school, very part time, just to have a little income in the mean time.

Two days ago, I answered a bunch of want ads, and sent them my cover letter, CV, and copies of my diplomas. Yesterday, I began receiving calls to set up interviews. Today, I had two interviews, and I remembered why I hate language school jobs and why I am willing to put in the time and effort to earn my PhD and hopefully, NEVER have to teach at a language school again.

At the first school, I sat down for the interview and the woman asked me, “Can I please have your passport?” This is so typical of job interviews in China. By showing up for the interview, they believe you have agreed to accept the job. I think, for them, it would be unimaginable that you would sit through the interview, but decide not to work for the company. I told her I would bring my passport next time.

“What year did you complete your BA?” Believe it or not, I was stymied. In all the years I have been working, no one ever asked me that question. In fact, when I hire people, I would only ask that question of people in their twenties, just to get a handle on how many years they have been working. With older people, you normally ask how many years of experience they have, or maybe if their degree was in a subject relevant to the job. You certainly don’t waste time asking about a BA if the applicant has a Masters or PhD. I thought back and I came up with the answer, “Nineteen ninety-four.” I wondered if she was even alive then. I also wondered if that was the wrong answer. Maybe they only hired people who graduated in odd numbered years.

The next question was, “Do you have teaching experience?” Now I was just stumped. If there was any possibility I was going to say “no” why would they even call me in for an interview? I was applying for a senior teaching position, not a trainee or just out of college job.

“You know, this information is all on the CV I sent you.” I told her. She looked a little uncomfortable. “I never received it.” She answered. As I really didn’t want the job anymore, I decided to be honest. “That’s impossible. It was attached to the very email that you responded to when you invited me to this interview. Also, wouldn’t the CV have been the reason you called me in?”

Part of my frustration wasn’t her fault, it was simply the frustration of being back at the bottom of the ESl world where I was when I first arrived in Asia, after having had great jobs in Europe. I wanted to believe that they had seen my CV, were impressed, and called me in. But now, I realize they simply called me in for no reason and were probably going to offer me the job.

“You sent your CV to Emma. I am Mary.” She explained. What the hell does that mean? “I sent the CV to the one and only email address on the job advert. What happened to it once it got here is none of my business.” She agreed, humbly. Then we sat in awkward silence, till I suggested. “Maybe you could go get my CV from Emma, and we could continue?”

The rest of the interview went reasonably well, until, as I was leaving she asked me what I planned to do after I finished my PhD. I told her I would probably teach at the British and American College. She asked, “Oh, do you have a degree that would allow you to do that?” first off, she knew I am getting a PhD in education and was asking what I planned to do after the PhD in education. So, isn’t it clear that I would be qualified? Next, she was holding my resume, but had obviously not read it. “I have a graduate degree in TESOL.” I told her. Suddenly, she seemed very interested, “Oh, you do? Wow, that is great.”

Believe it or not, they still wanted me to work there, as soon as we figure out which center is closest to my house.

The next interview was the all-time winner. I walked in and although they had spoken to me in Chinese on the phone, they insisted on speaking to me in English during the interview, but their English was so bad that I didn’t always understand the questions and they NEVER understood my answers. They led me to a small meeting room where they gave me a form to fill out. All of the information on the form was on my CV. Nowadays most professional schools have you copy and paste from your CV on line. Then they print out the form as a talking-point during the interview. I didn’t understand why they needed me to hand write the same information again, but I filled in the form. About half way down the page was a single block which read “Teaching Experience”. What did they want me to write in this block? I have been teaching on and off since 1988. There wasn’t room to write names and dates of schools. So, I just wrote “Fifteen years of experience, see CV for details.”

Believe it or not, that wasn’t the worst form I ever saw in the ESL world. Once, the block next to “experience” was the same size as the one next to “name.” I simply wrote the number “10”.

Another question asked how long I planned to be in Shanghai, so I wrote “Until I graduate in 2016.” Another asked how well I could speak Chinese, and I wrote “HSK 4”. The interviewer came in and the first thing she asked was “Can you introduce yourself to me?” This is exactly what we ask kids when we are evaluating their English. I have never had anyone begin a job interview like this, but I complied. Next, she asked, “When will you go back to your hometown?” My hometown? What does that even mean? I was born on Long Island, grew up in Queens, went to school in Brooklyn, lived in Tennessee…Where is my hometown, and why does she need to know when I plan to visit it?

Again, I knew what she meant, and why she asked. But it annoyed me that someone who runs an English school, which employs foreigners, would have so little concept of how to talk to foreigners or how our culture worked. The question about a hometown is significant for Chinese people. For westerners, we generally think of our hometown as where we reside. But for Chinese, the hometown is where you were born. The legal rights of Chinese citizens depend largely on where their legal hometown is. And because it is the city you were born, regardless of where you live, the official hometown can almost never be legally changed. If you are from a third tier hometown, you would have to apply for a visa to visit Hong Kong or Macau. Depending on your hometown, you may never be permitted to visit Taiwan. What’s more, you would need a permit to move to a large city like Shanghai or Beijing. No matter where you live, you would be required to return to your hometown of record, from time to time, to file certain paperwork or comply with government requirements.

I know this about their culture. But why don’t they know that this is not true of our culture? They say the average American moves house more than 5 times, and that 85% of Americans wouldn’t recognize the house they were born in.

“Do you mean how long will I remain in Shanghai?” I asked. She nodded. “Until I graduate in 2016” I said, pointing at where it was written on the form she was holding. She asked several other questions, all of which were on my CV and the form she was holding. When she asked about teaching experience, I told her I had been teaching for years and there was a detailed list on my CV. “Oh, well, have you taught in China?” Go check the CV! I wanted to shout. But I answered calmly, “Yes, I taught at Shanghai University.” She nodded and asked, “So, did you only teach children in China or have you also taught adults?”

What? “Neither, I taught at the university.” I repeated. She nodded, “And were the students adults or children?”

“They were university students.” I explained, losing patience. “I was a university teacher, teaching university students.” Now, I was starting to get a bit annoyed.

Her next question was hilarious, “Can you say some simple Chinese words?” To which I answered, “Yes, I can.” And we sat there silently for several minutes. Even if I wanted to give her a better answer, I didn’t know what she wanted. Did she actually want me to rattle of a list of simple Chinese words? Chair, table, stomach ache, tea spoon…I pointed at the form she was holding and said, “It says right here, HSK 4. If you need me to speak Chinese, I can.” She didn’t answer, so I switched to Chinese, but she sort of tuned me out.

Next, she asked how much money I wanted for a 100 minute class. I had never heard of a 100 minute class, so I wasn’t prepared for that question. Normally, you state a price per hour, and the classes can be as many hours as is customary at that school. An hour is usually only 50 minutes, but you get paid for the full hour. So, I thought for a minute, 100 minutes is a bit more than an hour and a half, so I told her my rate for a bit more than an hour and a half.

“So sorry, that is more than we can pay.” She told me. “I can only offer you our maximum.” The maximum was 10% less than what I had asked for. It wasn’t ideal, but I really should start working, and 10% isn’t that much to give up. Plus, it was probably going to be a very temporary job. So, I agreed.

“We would like to hire you, and you can begin teaching today at 5:30.” She announced. With that, she handed me an employment form to fill out, which had the same information as the previous form. There were also terms and conditions of employment, one of which said that if I agreed to teach a student, but quit before that student’s course ended, I owed the company $2,000. There was no scenario in the contract where the company might owe me $2,000.

“We have an adult student who wants to learn some information about Canada. Do you have information about Canada?” she asked.

“With me? No, I do not have information about Canada with me. But, if you have course books or materials about Canada, I would be happy to teach them.”

“Yes, we have many books.” She said, proudly.

“Books about Canada?” I asked.

“No.”

“I see.”

The interviewer excused herself, and another woman came in. I took her to be the boss, the one who had called me on the phone, speaking Chinese. She told me, “The student wants to learn oral English.” She told me.

“I thought she wanted to learn about Canada.” I said.

“She wants oral English about Canada.”

“I have no idea what that means.” I said, honestly.

“It’s OK. You can speak Chinese very well. She doesn’t speak any English, so you can explain to her in Chinese. Or her daughter can translate.”

“Her daughter? I thought this was a private lesson.”

“Yes, well, her daughter will also be in the class. She is eleven and speaks some English. She and her mother are moving to Canada and they both want to learn oral English.”

And the best way for them to learn oral English, apparently, is for me to talk to them in Chinese, or to have the daughter translate.

They took me to the book shelf and told me I could choose any book I wanted for the lesson. “I have no idea about the student or the books. Please tell me which one to use.” I said, thinking how far this was from university teaching and how much I hated doing this. They selected a business book which would have been way too difficult for someone who doesn’t speak English, and which had nothing to do with Canada, and which would have been completely inappropriate for an eleven year-old, who wouldn’t know those words and concepts in Chinese.

It was still two hours till the lesson was meant to start, so I said I would go down to the café and prepare. I noticed the book had listening and speaking lessons which required a CD. So I asked, “Do you have CD players in the classroom?”

The first interviewer told me, “I don’t think the CD will work.”

You don’t think? You mean you aren’t sure? Has this never come up before? “Why not?”  I asked.

“Because we do not have a CD player.” She answered, smartly. And yes, she was right, I also think if you don’t have a CD player, the CD will not work.

I took the book and was headed out the door when I realized I didn’t have paper. “Could I have some paper?” I asked. The boss lady asked, “Do you need a book or paper?” I don’t know why she asked that. But I answered, “I need some paper to prepare my lesson.” The other woman asked, “How many pieces, one?” Yes, I need exactly one piece of paper to prepare a lesson. God forbid you should hand me “some” paper. She gave me one piece of paper. As I headed to the elevator I was thinking, OK, I am going to do this one lesson, collect the fee, and then quit. But while I was waiting for the elevator, I thought, this is the dumbest job, at the dumbest company, and I am going to hate teaching these kinds of disorganized, unprofessional lessons. Also, something finally hit me about the money. At any other teaching job, fifty minutes is one hour. So a two hour class is 100 minutes. That means I should be getting two hours of pay. But they were only offering me one and a half hours worth.

I walked back into the office, and said, “I am really sorry, but I don’t want to work here.” I handed back the book, but I kept the single piece of paper. Ha, ha, I won.

“Why don’t you want to work here?” Asked the boss lady.

“Because you are too disorganized. You don’t even have a CD player. And the pay is too low.” Another issue was that it was more than an hour from my house, by subway. And there was no way I could justify a two hour roundtrip to teach 100 minutes and get paid a fraction of what I normally make.

I had said it. “You’re too disorganized. You don’t even have a CD player.” I said exactly what I was thinking. It is amazing that only when we want nothing do we receive everything. It was one of the most liberating moments of my life, not only because I was saying “no” to that job. I was saying “no” to every unprofessional language school for the rest of my life.

I will hold out for a university or corporate job. Life is too short to waste teaching “oral English about Canada.”

 

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.

Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey

See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk

facebook

Brooklyn Monk fan page

Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE

http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

 

 

Explanation of my Involvement in Cambodian and Chinese Martial Arts

In Uncategorized on February 17, 2014 at 3:42 pm

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By Antonio Graceffo

Wrestling Roots asked me to write an article explaining my Martial Arts Odyssey, which they used to make a page for me, so I can start publishing my wrestling research with them.

Wrestling Roots created a page for me to start publishing my wrestling research: http://wrestlingroots.org/the-travels-of-antonio-graceffo-the-brooklyn-monk/

 

I first came to Asia in 2001, when I went to Taiwan to study Chinese and kung fu, in preparation to go study at the Shaolin Temple, in Henan, China. In 2003, I went to Shaolin and studied san da. I have been in Asia for 13 years, now, studying martial arts and languages, and writing books about my experiences. I went from Shaolin to Thailand, where I lived in a temple, studying Muay Thai. While at the temple, I fought my first professional boxing match in Asia, to earn money for poor villagers, displaced by the war in Burma. From Thailand to Cambodia where I remained for about 18 months, studying boxing, Khmer kick boxing (bradal serey), and Bokator. Over the next 10 years, I studied in Korea, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, and other Asian countries, but I frequently returned to Cambodia for additional training and writing.

In 2007, I completed my black krama (black belt) in Bokator fighting. Part of the requirements for the belt were that I had to study traditional wrestling, and go fight in the Khmer traditional wrestling village in Vihear Suor village, Kandal province, just outside Phnom Penh. In the village, I participated in traditional wrestling competition, fighting in a dirt circle on the ground. I also fought in a traditional stick fighting competition, using a single, long stick. Fighters in the village fight for money in these competitions, but are careful not to kill each other. In that adventure, I got to know Jap Leun, the greatest Cambodian wrestler, and we would remain friends, and on-again, off-again training partners through to the present.

Other requirements for my black krama were that I trained bardal serey, kick boxing, with Paddy Carson, who had been my coach and trainer since 2004. I was required to have a minimum number of professional fights (which I completed with boxing fights), plus learn the bokator fighting techniques, including the knees, elbows, kicks, punches, as well as basic grappling and joint locking.

After passing the exam, I went on to Vietnam and other countries to study martial arts. In 2009, I returned to Thailand, where I studied Muay Thai Chaiya. My goal was to complete a study of the southeast Asia kickboxing arts, so I also studied Muay boran (ancient Muay Thai) from a variety of teachers and documented the training. I went on to Malaysia to study silat tomoi, an art which is a cross-over between Muay Thai and silat. It looks very similar to bokator or Muay Boran. I am far from an expert in kick boxing and have only had professional fights in boxing and MMA. I have never had a professional fight in Muay, but my goal was to document and record the arts, while learning as much as I could. The only Muay art I have not yet studied is Lethwei, Burmese boxing. I documented Lai Tai, a Shan Kung Fu art from Burma, but have not yet studied Lethwei. In 2010, I returned to Cambodia to study bradal serey intensely with Paddy Carson, who offered a belt exam to myself and my training partner, Robert Starkweather. Robert was graded as a brown belt, after about 6 years of training. I was awarded a black belt in bradal serey.

In July, 2011, I received a call, asking me to be a guest judge in the first professional MMA event in Malaysia. During the run of my web TV show, Martial Arts Odyssey, I had done a few episodes on MMA and was always fascinated by the art, but thought that at age 44 I was too old to learn it. Receiving that call was a life changing event. I refused the opportunity to be a judge, and instead, asked that I be registered as a fighter.

I returned to Cambodia for training and put together a makeshift MMA program between working with the Bokator master, and Paddy Carson for boxing and kickboxing, and K-1 Fight Factory for MMA and conditioning. While there, I put together Team Cambodia MMA, composed of myself and 3 Khmers from the Bokator Academy. After one month of training, the four of us, accompanied by the grand master, flew to Malaysia and fought in Mayhem II, the largest MMA event probably ever held in Southeast Asia, with over 60 fighters. I won my first fight and lost my second one that day. My Khmer teammate, Tun Serey, won two fights and placed second in his division, the first Khmer to ever win an MMA fight. After the event, my team went back to Cambodia, and I remained in Malaysia.

The first few months, I worked as a live-in bodyguard and trainer for a Dato (titled Lord) in Kuala Lumpur and trained full time with the MMA Wing Chun team, fighting out of Kota Damansara, Malaysia. I didn’t like the wing chun striking, so, I asked the Sifu to only work with me on ground fighting. This was my first exposure to jujitsu. I won my next two MMA fights while training on that team. Later, I moved to Johor Bahru, and lived inside of the Ultimate MMA Academy, where I trained full time and fought 5 more times, all wins. Periodically, I would fly back to Cambodia to touch up my boxing with Paddy Carson and to go exchange techniques at the Bokator Academy.

July, 2012, I moved back to China, where I taught full time at Shanghai University, teaching a research methodology course, based on the Australian Stock Exchange. For nearly a year, I couldn’t train at all, because of my work and study schedule. During that year, I published a number of papers and studied for the HSK national Chinese exam, which would allow me to enter a PhD program in China. By Spring 2013, I had been accepted to Shanghai University of Sport, with a full scholarship, to do a PhD in the Wu Shu department, but with traditional wrestling as my major. In the spring, I slowly began studying MMA again, part time, at Fighters Unite, Shanghai. I fought in one smoker MMA fight in April of 2013. I spent summer 2013 back at the Shaolin Temple, getting my body fit again, so I could handle training at the university. I also made arrangements at Shaolin to have a private teacher work with me two hours per day, preparing for my HSK Chinese exam, the final hurdle for my scholarship and studies. My training at Shaolin that summer was roughly 70% strength and fitness, and 30% san da. I fought one smoker san da fight, while I was at Shaolin, and won.

In August 2013, I passed the HSK exam. Then, I went to Beijing to live in a traditional wrestling school, where I had two training sessions per day, while I waited for school to start in Shanghai, at the end of September. When school started, I was permitted to join the traditional wrestling team, the first foreigner to do so. I also cross trained in san da. In November 2013, I won a silver medal in the Shanghai International BJJ Tournament, in the Chinese Traditional Wrestling division.

My dissertation proposal was finally approved. My topic is comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. Judo and san da are included within the scope of my research because they are both related to Chinese wrestling. Other arts included in the dissertation will be North Korean and Mongolian wrestling. Along the road to my dissertation, I am required to write what the Chinese call “small dissertations” basically research papers. And these can be on any form of comparative grappling I chose. My first paper was on comparative Chinese and Cambodian martial arts. I chose Cambodia, not only because of my experience with and knowledge of the arts there, but also because I checked the Chinese academic archives and they didn’t have any research about Cambodian martial arts. So, I was trying to add to the body of knowledge.

Over the Chinese New Year holiday, December 2013- February, 2014, I trained in Cambodia. In Phnom Penh, I work as a guest trainer for the Cambodian MMA TV show, which is similar to The Ultimate Fighter, called Khmer Warrior Champion. I also help train Khmer MMA fighters from AFIGHTER team, which now has contracts with One FC, Southeast Asia’s largest MMA organization. For my own training, I train every morning with my old friend, Jap Leun, at the national wrestling training center.

In the coming months, I plan to train and write in Vietnam, hopefully at the national sport training center in Hanoi, san da and wrestling. I also hope to get to Mongolia in summer 2014 for training and to compete in the wrestling events in the Naadam Festival.

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a PhD candidate at Shanghai University of sport, writing his dissertation on comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. He is martial arts and adventure author living in Asia, the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.

Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey

See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com

website

www.speakingadventure.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk

facebook

Brooklyn Monk fan page

Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE

http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

 

Brooklyn Monk in 3D

Order the download at http://3dguy.tv/brooklyn-monk-in-3d/

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

 

 

Chinese List-Arguments

In Uncategorized on February 5, 2014 at 3:12 pm

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By Antonio Graceffo

One of my frustrations in listening to my lectures at the university, and especially when listening to lectures by my martial arts teachers, is that in Chineseculture, it is considered educated and refined to speak in lists. For example, a teacher will say, “Ideal fighting includes coordination of the internal and the external.” Then he will ask, “Does anyone know what that means?” And I can assure you, it is a rhetorical question, no answer is expected. He will wait a second or two, then give a sly smile, to show how stupid everyone else in the roomis, and he will explain. “Coordination of the external and internal means shou, yan, shen, fa, bu, qi, li, and gong.” He gives that a moment to sink in and then he asks a second rhetorical question. “Does anyone know what that means?” Obviously, we are not expected to answer, only to stare blankly. He will then shake his head, as if to say, “How can people be so dumb?” and he will explain, “ shou is shou fa de shou (hand techniques), yan is yan jing de yan (eyes), shen is she ti de shen (body), fa is zwo fa de fa (method) and gong is gong fu de gong (kung fu).” He will then go on to explain each element separately. And in the course of explaining that element, there will be more lists of stuff.

“Shou fa includes da, la, na and hu. Does anyone know what those are?” At which point I write in my notebook, “No, but I bet you’re about to tell us.” By the time he gets done explaining the elements of shou fa, I have forgotten the larger context of the original list, and how that related to whatever the lecture was that it interrupted.

In Chinese society, it is considered educated and refined to always know the right list, and to recite it at exactly the right moment during a discussion. In fact, if you are arguing, the minute you recite a list to support your opinion, you have won, unless the opponent recites a contrary list. This style of argument is what I believe early Christians did in Europe, quoting from the Bible. Because the Bible was written in Latin, it was inaccessible to anyone who couldn’t read or speak Latin. So, it was impossible for common people to ever win an argument against the upper class. I think other societies, even early Jews, had a similar style of argument. In Fiddler on the Roof, for example, when people would go to the Rabi for advice. His answers were always direct quotes from the Torah. Tevia, of course, would make up his own Bible quotes, “As the Good Book tells us, when a poor man eats a chicken, one of them is sick.” When his friends try to protest that he just invented that, he comes back with, “Well, somewhere in the Bible, there is something about a poor man and something about a chicken.”

So, although this style of argument existed in other cultures, it is extremely antiquated. As a language learner, it is extremely frustrating. When they say the list, it is always a list of one syllable characters, which represent two syllable words. For example “shen”. Then I have to wait for the first set of explanation when he tells me “shen ti de shen” which I know means “body.” Then I have to wait for the second round of explanation to know how this relates. My doctoral lectures are 3 hours long, and extremely tedious.

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.

Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey

See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com

website

www.speakingadventure.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk

facebook

Brooklyn Monk fan page

Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE

http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

 

Brooklyn Monk in 3D

Order the download at http://3dguy.tv/brooklyn-monk-in-3d/

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Tags:

Chinese,china,wrestling,Beijing,shanghai,university,sport,Shuai,jiao,wrestling,wrestle,wrestler,Antonio,graceffo,Brooklyn,monk,training,speaking,language,learning,coach,trainer

The Tantrum and the Hotel Room

In Uncategorized on February 4, 2014 at 1:25 pm

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The Tantrum and the Hotel Room

By Antonio Graceffo

Just had the worst temper tantrum I have had in years. I was screaming so hard I hurt my throat and my head.

After an 18 hour flight plus layover in Hong Kong, where I didn’t sleep, I checked into a hotel I Phnom Penh, around 10 AM, very exhausted. I asked the receptionist for the WiFi code, but she didn’t know what wi-fi was. We went back and forth, with me describing the internet, email, and the microprocessor, until she figured out what I was talking about. That’s when she told me she didn’t know the password. And I think that’s a totally normal thing. Why would the receptionist at the hotel know the WiFi password? It’s not like people who check in would ever ask about that.

Up to this point, this was all still Asia-normal. I was prepared for these stutter steps and simply went to my room and began unpacking. Eventually, she brought me a password, which didn’t work. When I asked her for a valid password, she explained to me that internet doesn’t really work with laptops. Obviously, it was my fault. This is where I was starting to get a bit heated. I even knew to expect this type of stupid defense “Internet doesn’t exist”, or “It’s bad for your eyes.” But I was tired, and wondered why we had to go through all the steps again. Jumping ahead, I told her to call someone to fix it. But she didn’t know what that was.

You have to understand, I am condensing the events of several hours into a few sentences. By this time, I had already been checked in for four hours. When she finally understood the concept of calling someone, she assured me he would be there in two hours. So, I went out for two and a half hours, completely expecting the internet to NOT be working. It turned out, my expectations matched my reality.

“Did he come yet?” I asked.

“Who?”

“The guy you called about the internet.”

“Guy? Internet? Call?”…. Eventually she said he was coming later. At this point I had been awake for well over 24 hours, so I lay down for a nap.

When I woke up there was a new person at reception. I asked him about the WiFi. He explained to me that WiFi requires a password. Thank goodness, because I had never used internet before. He gave me a different password from the one the girl had given me, and I flipped out. I showed him the two passwords were different, demanding an explanation. But he just kept saying random words like “WiFi, download, Bogota”. OK, Wilson. I typed in this password, but it didn’t work. So, he went and got the master copy of the password, which apparently was laying right on the desk, the whole day, and could have been shown to me at any time. This password was different again. And, once again, it didn’t work.

I started shouting, but I hadn’t completely lost it yet. “Why did you tell me the wrong thing three times?”

And this is when the camel’s back broke with an audible “CRASH” he asked, “Can you try using the WiFi instead?”

“What the f—-?”

That was it, I went insane. It was as if the whole day of questions and attempts to use the WiFi hadn’t happened. It was, what I like to call, the Phnom Penh Groundhog Day effect, where nothing you did, said, planned, negotiated or agreed upon up to that point actually happened. I checked out of the room, on principle, and paid 75% of the overnight price, although I had only been there 6 hours in the middle of the day. Then I paid a tuktuk to move me to another hotel. So, I lost money. Lost time. And nearly ruptured my spleen with anger. Nice day!

Keywords: Phnom,Penh,Cambodia,Brooklyn,Monk,Antonio,Graceffo,travel,antitravel,anti,Asia,adventure

 

Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries.

Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey

See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com

website

www.speakingadventure.com

Twitter

http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk

facebook

Brooklyn Monk fan page

Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE

http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1

 

Brooklyn Monk in 3D

Order the download at http://3dguy.tv/brooklyn-monk-in-3d/

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor)

http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com

 

 

San Da, Shanghai University of Sport (Parts 1 through 4)

In Uncategorized on February 3, 2014 at 2:53 am

IMG_4227 IMG_4234 IMG_4263 ?????????????   San Da is a Chinese kickbixng art which includes kicks, punches, and wrestling takedowns. In September, 2013, Antonio Graceffo began studying for a PhD at Shanghai University of Sport, where he is writing his dissertation (in Chinese) about comparative forms of Chinese wrestling. San Da is included in his research because of its wrestling component. Special guest star, Aj Richardi, US San Da fighter and Masters Degree student at Shanghai University of Sport.

San Da, Shanghai University of Sport (Part 1)

http://youtu.be/uVTu9jKeh-g

San Da, Shanghai University of Sport (Part 2)

http://youtu.be/LKdqJ5lvAE0

San Da, Shanghai University of Sport (Part 3)

San Da, Shanghai University of Sport (Part 4)

 

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Brooklyn Monk, Antonio Graceffo is a martial arts and adventure author living in Asia. He is the author of the books, “Warrior Odyssey’ and “The Monk from Brooklyn.” He is also the host of the web TV show, “Martial Arts Odyssey,” which traces his ongoing journey through Asia, learning martial arts in various countries. Warrior Odyssey, the book chronicling Antonio Graceffo’s first six years in Asia is available at amazon.com. The book contains stories about the war in Burma and the Shan State Army. The book is available at http://www.blackbeltmag.com/warrior_odyssey See Antonio’s Destinations video series and find out about his column on  http://www.blackbeltmag.com Email Antonio Antonio@speakingadventure.com website www.speakingadventure.com Twitter http://twitter.com/Brooklynmonk facebook Brooklyn Monk fan page Brooklyn Monk on YOUTUBE http://www.youtube.com/user/brooklynmonk1 Brooklyn Monk in 3D Order the download at http://3dguy.tv/brooklyn-monk-in-3d/ Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor) http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com Brooklyn Monk in Asia Podcast (anti-travel humor) http://brooklynmonk.podomatic.com